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Angry Robot, Extracts, Free

New Extracts: The Mad Scientist’s Daughter, She Returns From War

As it’s the season of good will and all that jazz, we thought we’d give you an early present in the form of another two free samples, this time from our February 2013 releases.

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke is a stand-alone tale of love, loss and robotics. And She Returns From War by Lee Collins is the second Cora Oglesby weird western, sequel to The Dead of Winter.

Both books will be on-sale in the UK/EU from February 7th next year and in the US/CAN and ebook from January 29th.

Click on the widgets below to activate them, or use the links beneath to visit issuu.com, where you’ll find sharing buttons, embed code, links and all sorts, should you wish to add any or all of these extracts to your own blog or website.

 

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter

by Cassandra Rose Clarke

“Cat, this is Finn. He’s going to be your tutor.”

He looks and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task now is to tutor Cat. As she grows into a beautiful young woman, Finn is her guardian, her constant companion… and more.

But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, however, Finn struggles to find his place in the world.

Following her acclaimed Young Adult debut for our sister imprint Strange Chemistry, The Assassin’s Curse, the very talented Cassandra Rose Clarke moves on to more adult themes, in a heartbreaking story of love, loss … and robots.

Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

 

She Returns From War

by Lee Collins

Four years after the horrific events in Leadville, a young woman from England, Victoria Dawes, sets into motion a series of events that will lead Cora and herself out into the New Mexico desert in pursuit of Anaba, a Navajo witch bent on taking revenge for the atrocities committed against her people.

Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

Enjoy!

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Angry Robot, Cover Art, Interesting Stuff

Cover launch: The Mad Scientist’s Daughter

{ Click for a larger version. }

Cassandra Rose Clarke is already setting the imaginations of YA bloggers and reviewers aflame as her Strange Chemistry debut, The Assassin’s Curse starts shipping out to stores for its October launch. Here at Angry Robot we’re readying the second stage of her plans for world domination with a heartbreakingly wonderful novel of love, loss and robots, The Mad Scientist’s Daughter.

Set in a collapsing future America, the novel tells of Cat. When she is a young girl, her father brings an experimental android to their isolated home to serve as her tutor. Finn stays with her, becoming her constant companion and friend as she grows to adulthood. But then they take the relationship much further than anyone intended – which ultimately threatens to force them apart forever.

This unnerving but deeply sensitive mix of science fiction speculation and heartfelt emotion demanded a very different cover approach for us. As you can see, designer Stewart Larking came up with the goods in a lovely understated, almost melancholy style. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter will be published by Angry Robot in February 2013. We cannot wait for you to read it.

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5th Birthday

Angry Robot 5: Amanda’s 5 Things Wot I Learned From Publishing

Tuesday 1 July marked 5 years from Angry Robot’s first books – Lauren Beukes‘ Moxyland and Kaaron Warren‘s Slights – and throughout this week we have celebrated with daily staff blog posts and giveaways! Author guest posts and other cool giveaways have popped up on various sites – and continue to  – so do keep an eye out for our #AngryRobot5 on Twitter for new posts.

On the blog this week we’ve had Senior Editor Lee Harris with his Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules; MD Marc Gascoigne with his 5 lessons learned; Publicity Manager Caroline Lambe with her 5 Favourite Angry Robot Characters; and Mike Underwood, US Sales & Marketing Manager, with his 5 Favourite Angry Robot Covers.

The final slot belongs to our very own Amanda Rutter who, on her last day at Angry Robot / Strange Chemistry, is giving away her 5 Favourite Angry Robot Books, and writing about her 5 Things Wot I Learned From Publishing.

It’s an emotional day for me: my last day working for Angry Robot and being the editor for Strange Chemistry. I wondered about what my blog post should be for a little while (you almost got Lee’s 5 Worst Puns – but I decided I just couldn’t inflict that level of pain on you all!) Finally, I decided to do a little farewell in the form of the 5 things that I have learnt while working in publishing.

1. Patience!

My God, you have to be patient! I came from an accounting background, where things were required yesterday, where the monthly accounts would be closed in five days, where emails were replied to instantly. Everything was snap, snap, snap. And then I walked into publishing… In my first month, everyone got sick of the refrain “When can we…?” When can we release this gorgeous cover art that we’ve received for a book, when can we announce an author, when can we put books up on Netgalley, when can we, when can we, when can we… It has taken me pretty much the whole of this two years and seven months with Strange Chemistry to settle down and realise that publishing moves at its own special pace. Authors, you think you can’t handle the wait times? Well, I haven’t been finding it easy either!

2. You just know.

People say that you always just know when you meet the person who you are going to marry. That women just know when they put on the wedding dress that is perfect for them. That you just know when you walk into the house that is going to become your home. The same is true for books you end up taking to acquisitions. Every single one of those books that went out through Strange Chemistry, I adored. I got shivers when I started reading the first few pages. I stayed up late to finish them. I could already see how I might advise the author to tighten this section, or maybe move that chapter. I was entirely invested in those books before they went to acquisitions. I just knew.

3. You can do everything right, but…

You can acquire the most brilliant book in the world, you can put a stunning cover on it, you can see positive reviews flooding it, but… it doesn’t sell. For whatever reason, it doesn’t appeal to readers. I have taken books to acquisition that I am so passionate about. I have watched the whole team get excited and think that this book, this could be the one that really sets the world alight. I have watched the reviews come in and been so joyful that people share my opinion of the book, and delighted that I have been able to put this story out into the world. But something just doesn’t click. Perhaps the timing of the release. Perhaps the marketplace. Perhaps there was a sporting event on and people weren’t reading as much that month. We’d all love to know how to bottle the success of certain books, but you just can’t anticipate how a novel will be received. Of course, it does make it all the more precious when a book fires the imagination of the reading public.

4. How many publishing people does it take to change a lightbulb?

 Probably just one, we’re quite capable in many ways! What I’m really talking about here is the sheer number of people involved in bringing a novel to a bookstore. I had this lovely naïve view of an editor reading a book and then putting a nice cover on it and ta da, it was done. Maybe not *that* naïve, but I had absolutely no idea of who is involved.

First you have the author, then the agent, then the acquisitions editor, then the publishing team who help agree the acquisitions, then the art director, then the cover artist, then the marketing person, then the publicity person, then the copy editor, then the proofreader, then the designer who lays out the book, then the production team who send the book to print, then the sales reps who get out there to sell in the book… There are so many different layers to publishing a novel that editors are, in fact, project managers. And I was doing this for, at one stage, two books a month, twenty two books a year (none in December, smartarse, before you start counting on your fingers!) It’s no wonder that your regular editor is often working til late in the office, then going home to read manuscripts in the evening, so that all of these tasks can be fulfilled!

5. Publishing people are the best!

I have had the best two years and seven months, and that is without a doubt down to the people I have met through this job. My fabulous colleagues (who I am going to miss beyond words); my incredible authors (who I wish all the very best in the future); the agents (who have been professional, caring and somehow managed to balance author and editor with aplomb); the freelancers (who have done such a sterling job behind the scenes to make the books as tight as they can possibly be); and the book bloggers/reviewers (who have shown such passion for all the Strange Chemistry books). I salute you all. You have made my job easy. You have made my job fun. You have made me enjoy every single day that I walked into this office and sat down at my desk and realised that I was bringing stories to the world. Thank you!

photo (29)Amanda’s Giveaway

And now, before I go away and weep a little – it IS an emotional day, after all – I bring you my prize pack for this blog post. I am offering one person my five favourite Angry Robot books. These would be: Zoo City by Lauren Beukes, Sixty-One Nails by Mike Shevdon, The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke, The Corpse-Rat King by Lee Battersby and The Alchemist of Souls by Anne Lyle.

Entry Details

To win, just let me know, in the comments, your five favourite books of all time. The winner will be picked at random and entries close on Monday 7 July at 12.01pm BST.

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5th Birthday, Angry Robot

Angry Robot 5: Caroline’s Top 5 Characters

Yesterday, Tuesday 1 July, marked 5 years from Angry Robot’s first books – Lauren Beukes‘ Moxyland and Kaaron Warren‘s Slights – and throughout this week we are celebrating with daily staff blog posts and giveaways! Author guest posts and other cool giveaways will be popping up on various sites so keep an eye out on Twitter’s #AngryRobot5 for new posts.

If you’ve missed the earlier posts, here’s links to Lee Harris with his Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules and Marc Gascoigne with 5 lessons learned. Next up is Caroline Lambe, Publicity Manager, as always hating writing about herself in the third person. Caroline’s choice of giveaway is a special bumper pack; details are at the end of this post.

To pick 5 favourite characters from a range of books like Angry Robot’s is very hard; I was tempted to write a whistleblowing post on the 5 characters that are my colleagues, but I’m sure the Robot Overlords would send me to the scrapheap if I tried. However, I’ve tried to narrow it down so allow me share with you my Top 5 Characters from our books.

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is one of my favourite Angry Robot books, and is responsible for one of my Top 5 Characters: Finn. In Finn, Cassandra Rose Clarke created a character that, although is an android, shows more emotion than most of the human characters. The book explores humanity, consciousness, and love, of which Finn is the embodiment. When I first started this book, I treated Finn warily – he was the outsider who appeared like a ghost to Cat and scared her. But their relationship, of which I was so sceptical, blossoms tenderly, unexpectedly and believably, and all because of Finn. He is a character of impressive emotional range, and is so much more than a tangle of wires and circuits.

“There is nothing else like me in the entire world, said Finn. “That’s what you wrote. I’m the only one. I can’t tell you what it means to be the only one of my kind,” he said. “I can’t…There is a lack in myself. But your thesis almost filled it in. It was…a start.” Finn

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuWesley Chu’s debut novel, The Lives of Tao, has received rave reviews and awards, and for me – like many others – Roen is a huge part of the reason. He doesn’t want to be a hero; why can’t he sit at home every evening after work, eating pizza, and being miserable? Roen is that person we fear we will be: stuck in a job we hate, in a rut with our life, and unable to do anything about it. Whilst Tao comes along for Roen and forces a change, The Lives of Tao shows us that we don’t need our own Tao to live inside our heads – and I’m certainly OK without being chased by the Genjix – but we can all change and become the people we want to be.

Plus, Roen has some of the best lines and action scenes: when he confronts the mugger and the bottles don’t break and then asks the mugger for his money? I love Roen!

“I can’t quit. I have rent, and a cat to support.” Roen

 

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Between Two Thorns presents a harder choice: Catherine Rhoeas-Papaver or Gargoyle? The gargoyle is hilarious and a great sidekick but plays a far more important role as he articulates Max’s feelings. Cathy is resourceful, brave, and strong but also stubborn, and rebellious with a wicked temper, and pips the gargoyle to the post as my favourite Split Worlds character. 

Cathy is against everything her family believes, the restrictive life of the society in which she was raised, and her struggles against this world feel authentic. She doesn’t lose sight of what she wants, It’s tricky to say too much about Cathy without giving away the events across the trilogy, but if you have yet to visit The Split Worlds, I highly recommend you do.

Plus, if ever you’re in Bath, I dare you to try not look for access to the Nether!

Blackbirds, by Chuck WendigMiriam Black has her first outing in Chuck Wendig’s
Blackbirds, and I unashamedly love her. She might gross and creep me out sometimes, but wouldn’t you be deranged if death following your every move? By simply having skin on skin contact – a fingertip graze, a bump – Miriam can tell where, when, and how you will die. Does she thus try to prevent deaths? HELL, NO. Miriam uses this power to track people about to die, robs their still-warm bodies, and spends the money on her favourite things: alcohol and cigarettes. Blackbirds is morbid and terrifying, and brilliant. It’s utterly refreshing to read a character like Miriam: a foul-mouthed, vile anti-heroine who is laugh-out-loud sarcastic. Beware: if you’re used to reading lighter books, or aren’t OK with some super-gross descriptions, gore, etc, Miriam may not be for you!

“A lady should be respectful,” is all he manages through gritted teeth. He pitches the towel in the corner.
Miriam snorts. “That’s me. My fair fuckin’ lady.” Miriam

The Bullet Catcher's Daughter by Rod DuncanExcuse me, but I think I’m going to cheat a little with my fifth choice! So far, I’ve brought you characters you may have already read and liked – or loathed – but for my final character, I’m picking an upcoming: Elizabeth Barnabus from The Bullet Catcher’s Daughter, publishing Sept, 2014. Rod Duncan is an award-winning crime novelist and it shows as he creates a clever story, in a novel exploring many boundaries. Elizabeth is a courageous cross-dressing private detective, who takes on the persona of her imagined twin brother, Edwin, to solve the mystery of a missing aristocrat and a hoard of arcane machines. She is cunning, an accomplished liar, and an adept reader of people.

She is driven, intriguing, and her dialogue is snappy and brings her to life. I can’t wait for you all to meet Elizabeth Barnabas!

“I’m no more than a shadow, and can have only such friendships and feelings as a shadow might.” Elizabeth

So, what do you think? Did I leave out your favourite character or do you totally agree / disagree with who I’ve picked? Who would your Top 5 Angry Robot characters be? Tweet us @angryrobotbooks to join the conversation and don’t forget to use our #AngryRobot5.

Caroline’s Giveaway

For my giveaway, instead of 5 copies of 1 book, I’m going to go with a bumper prize pack of these 5 books! If it’s my choice, I might as well give you 5 of my favourite books to enjoy. So, one winner will receive The Mad Scientist’s Daughter, The Lives of Tao, Between Two ThornsBlackbirds, and The Bullet Catcher’s Daughter.

Entry Details

To enter, comment below and tell us your most memorable book character. It doesn’t have to be from Angry Robot, but any character you loved – or indeed love to hate – in a book. Winner will be picked at random, no geographical restrictions. Entries will close tomorrow, Thursday, at 12.01pm BST, when we will have Mike’s post with another giveaway!

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5th Birthday, Angry Robot, Free, General skiffy bollocks

Angry Robot 5: Lee’s Top 5

Tuesday 1 July marks 5 years from Angry Robot’s first books – Lauren Beukes‘ Moxyland and Kaaron Warren‘s Slights – and we are celebrating this anniversary, over the next 5 days, with daily staff blog posts and giveaways! Author guest posts and other cool giveaways will be popping up on various sites so keep an eye out for our #AngryRobot5 on Twitter for new posts.

First up is our Senior Editor, Lee Harris, with his Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules, and his choice of giveaway is The Knights of Breton Court (omnibus edition x 5) by Maurice Broaddus. Details of this giveaway, and why Lee chose The Knights of Breton Court are at the end of this post.

Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules

5. A Home for New Talent

In the 5 years since Angry Robot first started publishing, we’ve published the debut novels of TWENTY-ONE authors:

Lauren Beukes – Moxyland
Kaaron Warren – Slights
Mike Shevdon – Sixty-One Nails
Aliette de Bodard – Servant of the Underworld
Lavie Tidhar – The Bookman
Ian Whates – City of Dreams and Nightmare
Maurice Broaddus – King Maker
Guy Haley – Reality 36
Jo Anderton – Debris
Adam Christopher – Empire State
David Tallerman – Giant Thief
Chris F Holm – Dead Harvest
Anne Lyle – The Alchemist of Souls
Madeline Ashby – vN
Lee Battersby – The Corpse-Rat King
Lee Collins – The Dead of Winter
Ramez Naam – Nexus
Emma Newman – Between Two Thorns
Wesley Chu – The Lives of Tao
Jay Posey – Three
Craig Cormick – The Shadow Master

With plenty more to come, including:

Carrie Patel – The Buried Life
Susan Murray – The Waterborne Blade
Ferrett Steinmetz – Flex
Ishbelle Bee – The Singula and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath
Alyc Helms – The Dragons of Heaven

4. Marc Gascoigne Wins the 2011 World Fantasy Award

Angry Robot founder and head honcho Marc Gascoigne won the World Fantasy Special Award (Professional) for his work in setting up and running Angry Robot. And bloody well deserved it was, too!

3. DRM-free ebooks

We’re big fans of the ebook format, and we know that many of you are, too. We’re also big fans of not crippling the format with unnecessary and impractical restrictions. This is why we’ve always been DRM-free, and always will be.

2.  Clonefiles – Ebook /Paperback Bundling

We believe if you’ve paid for a paperback you should get the ebook included. In 2012 we ran a limited pilot in the UK to offer this service through independent bookshops. In 2013 we announced we would be opening this pilot up to indie stores in the US, and this has started to happen. It was such a great idea that Amazon announced their version of the programme shortly after us (though many of the ebooks in their Matchbook scheme have to be paid for, albeit at discount).

1. Those Covers!

They say you can’t judge a book by its cover. I say bollocks. But whatever your thoughts on the matter, you certainly can judge a publisher on its covers. And look at some of the gorgeousness we’ve brought you over the last five years, under Marc Gascoigne’s Art Directorshipness. Take your time. Appreciate the different styles, and the love that has gone into each and every one.

Empire State by Adam ChristopherThe Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013

Zoo City by Lauren BeukesThe Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuThe Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013Dead Harvest, by Chris F. HolmThe Damned Busters by Matthew HughesThe Alchemist of Souls by Anne LyleThree, by Jay Posey, artwork by Stephen Mayer-RassowHeartwood by Freya RobertsonSixty-One Nails by Mike Shevdon, new cover artThe Great Game by Lavie Tidhar - you know you want itNightTerrors-300dpiSlights - in UK stores 1 July 09Blackbirds, by Chuck Wendig

 

Lee’s Giveaway

CThe Knights of Breton Court cover (Joey HiFI) - October 2012aroline has asked me to choose a book for today’s giveaway.

Maurice Broaddus’s King Maker (first of the Knights of Breton Court trilogy) was the first book I actively championed when I joined Angry Robot. It’s a fantastic retelling of the Arthurian myth, set on the mean streets of Indianapolis. So, my giveaway is going to be the entire trilogy: The Knights of Breton Court x 5!

Entry Details

To enter, simply comment on this post with your Top 5 TV shows. Winner will be picked at random. Entries will close tomorrow, Tuesday at 12.01pm BST, when we will have Marc’s post with another giveaway!

For brownie points, join in our #AngryRobot5 conversation on Twitter and tell us about your favourite Angry Robot book, or if you haven’t read one yet, which you would like to pick first! Don’t forget to include us: @angryrobotbooks

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Angry Robot, Events, Free

Angry Robot Live!

Dear Robot Readers,

Mike Underwood, Sales & Marketing-o-Tron here with some cool news.

I love conventions – they’re a chance to bring together authors to discuss interesting, important, and/or irreverent topics in writing and cross-pollinate ideas and experiences. Not to mention the amazing, off-the-wall conversations that happen in the hallways, restaurants, and the bars. Especially the bars.

I’m also a podcaster, and a while back, I wanted to apply the fun of podcasting to my marketing work with Angry Robot and see if there was a way to bring some of the amazing convention-style conversations to readers around the world without having to shell out for a convention pass or a plane ticket. Which leads directly to…

Angry Robot Live.

Monday, April 28th, at 8:30PM EDT, I’m going to moderate a live Google+ discussion with four critically-acclaimed Angry Robot authors about 21st Century Science Fiction. Our panelists will be:

Madeline Ashby, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Kitschie and Locus-nominated vN
Cassandra Rose Clarke, author of PKD-nominated The Mad Scientist’s Daughter
Ramez Naam, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Promethus, Kitschie, and Arthur C. Clarke-nominated Nexus, and the Prometheus-nominated Crux
Wesley Chu, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Alex Award-winning The Lives of Tao.

If you have questions about Science Fiction or any of these authors works that you’d like me to ask at the panel, please comment below. And be on the lookout for the link to join the discussion live on Monday the 28th!

For those who won’t be able to attend live, we’ll record the panel to be uploaded to YouTube, as well as archiving it on Google+ for viewing long into the 21st Century.

 

UPDATED: RSVP here for a chance at book giveaways!

author headshot for Cassandra Rose Clarke
Cassandra Rose Clarke
Ramez Naam Author headshot
Ramez Naam
Author headshot for Madeline Ashby
Madeline Ashby

 

 

Author headshot for Wesley Chu
Wesley Chu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Angry Robot, Guest Posts

Celebrating IWD: Cassandra Rose Clarke

Today’s International Women’s Day piece comes from our Philip K Dick Award nominated author Cassandra Clarke!

“Dinosaurs eat man. Woman inherits the earth”

The Author, Cassandra Rose Clarke
Cassandra Rose Clarke

It’s a blazingly hot day, June 1993. I’m nine years old and this memory is the only one I have of that particular summer, although I can certainly fill in the blanks with memories from other years—swimming pools and sprinklers and summer camp enrollment designed to keep TV from melting my brain out through my ears. But those memories are generic. This one’s special.

The whole family’s going to the movies. Me, my mom, my dad, my brother. We pile into the car and drive down to the theater for the first showing at mid-morning, arriving nearly forty minutes early. We’re the only people in the theater for at first. This early-arrival-at-a-morning-show is a scheme of my parents, who frequently go to excessive lengths to avoid “the crowds.” (I won’t see the inside of an amusement park until I’m an adult for this reason.) We settle into the best seats in the theater, Cokes and popcorn at the ready, and wait.

The movie we’re waiting for is Jurassic Park.

There are a handful of movies I remember seeing in the theater, and Jurassic Park is one of the earliest, after The Little Mermaid. At nine years old, I was terrified throughout the entire thing, covering my eyes whenever I thought a dinosaur was about to eat someone, but when I walked out of the theater I was completely enamored. Jurassic Park was now my favorite movie; later, it would be my favorite book as well. I dreamed of becoming a paleontologist and wearing kicky high-waisted shorts like Dr. Sattler, and for the next few years, any trips to the dinosaur exhibit at the Houston Museum of Natural Science were spent ogling up at the big T-Rex skeleton in the entryway, pretending I had a PhD and one of those brushes for dusting dirt away from bones.

Jurassic Park was the first science fiction property to capture attention and earn my love. Like others my age, I grew up watching Star Trek: The Next Generation (and putting my headband over my eyes so I could be Geordi), and as a child I caught Star Wars on TBS one dreary Saturday afternoon, although for years afterward I would confuse it with Cocoon.  Science fiction novels weren’t really on my radar unless they made their way to the Newbery Medal nominee list. But Jurassic Park changed all that. There is a sense of wonder present in that movie which has stuck with me—remember the scene when Dr. Sattler and Dr. Grant see the dinosaurs for the very first time? I still remember the chill I got when I watched their expressions of shock and delight, and that’s the same feeling I get whenever I experience great science fiction, whether I find it on the page, on the screen, or in my imagination.

I originally intended to write this blog post about Dr. Sattler—how she was given the save-the-day scenes in the movie, and had to face down velociraptors and turn the power back on while Dr. Grant was tasked with the more nurturing role of caring for Hammond’s two grandkids. And that’s worth mentioning, although as a kid I didn’t admire her for being Action Girl and Subverting Gender Expectations. Rather, I admired her because she was smart, and pretty, and a scientist. She was the sort of person I wanted to grow up to be—the sort of woman I wanted to grow up to be.

And no, I never became a scientist. I became a writer instead, a science fiction writer. But I do think in some small way, Jurassic Park—and Dr. Ellie Sattler—helped me find that path. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013

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Angry Robot, Awards, Robot Round-Up

Robot Round Up 31/01/14

Hi everyone,

It’s round up time again and this week we’re taking a look at all the fantastic awards and nominations our authors have been getting lately!

 

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013First up, we’re so excited that The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke has been nominated for the Philip K. Dick award! What is it about this book that readers and critics love so much? Here are just a few of the many amazing reviews:

“You won’t be the same after you read The Mad Scientist’s Daughter, trust me. […] Rich, complex, and delightfully-developed, The Madman’s Daughter opens up new worlds of possibility and does so with elegance and grace.”
-s.e. smith, at this ain’t livin’

“The characters are what drives this story, whether it’s Cat struggling through life, her mad yet grounded and caring father, the friends and lovers Cat meets throughout her life, or Finn, the android who doesn’t want to be human yet seems like the most perfect creation.”
– Katherine Stubbs, Shades of Sentience

“One of the most heart-clenching and gut-wrenching love stories I have ever read. I bet no-one reading this review has ever read an unrequited love story where the love is only unrequited because science has not made it possible, yet. Heart meet knife! Clarke’s exploration of human nature versus science versus faith versus the disingenuous youth are the reasons this book needs to be read and loved by everyone.”
– Vicki, Open Book Society

“I urge you to read this book, it will haunt you and stay with you for a long time. It is very hard to believe that this is only the author’s second novel – bravo Miss Clarke!”
– Wendy of the Geek Syndicate

“The twist is that the cool, rational Finn is a robot, and Cat’s love for him is unrequited because she ages while he does not, and he is not programmed to respond to her emotions. It’s a neat premise and Clark examines the ramifications with the precision of a poet”.
– Eric Brown, The Guardian

“It’s not a story of future heroism. It’s not even, really, a story about robots. It’s a story of live and failure and expectations. It is, perhaps, in its relentless examination of one woman’s life, one of the most realistic science fiction stories ever told.”
– Michael Ann Dobbs for IO9.com

“Cat is a finely etched character, difficult, distant, and living in denial of her true feelings for years … Cassandra Rose Clarke does a fine job of staying inside her protagonist’s head, and capturing what it’s like to drift through life without the will or the opportunity to make the best decisions.”
– Adam-Troy Castro, Sci Fi Magazine (print only)

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter reminded me of a couple of books I haven’t read in years, books I loved dearly that still haunt me. It has the strange feel of Geoff Ryman’s The Child Garden, a terribly sad story that was ultimately so rewarding. It also sparked some of the same emotions I feel while reading anything by China Miéville.”
– Tammy Sparks, Books, Bones & Buffy

“This book is about LOVE mostly and family, betrayal, emotion and what happiness means, but so totally science fiction. It is an amazing book and I enjoyed so much that I will be looking for more books by Cassandra Rose Clarke.”
– Katie Turner, Turner’s Antics

“At it’s heart, it’s a beautifully written story, not only exploring the complexities between Cat and Finn, but also her changing relationships with her parents, and the other men who enter her life.”
– Michelle, BCF Book Reviews

“I read this book with a constant sense of impending doom…I expected disaster and drama around ever corner. But this isn’t one of those books. This book is more subtle, a much more realistic picture of an imagined world, and I loved it.”
– Leah at LeahRhyne.com

“Cassandra Rose Clarke has proven she can write with the best of them in this one and I expect this was just a taste of what is to come from her.”
– Liam, The Troubled Scribe

“this book is heavy on the romance side. The science fiction element is there but very subtle but not as much until it becomes superficial. Instead, it gives the story this otherworldly quality.”
– Zuleeza at **QWERTY**

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus by Ramez Naam
Nexus

Second, the fantastic Nexus by Ramez Naam has been nominated for the Golden Tentacle (Debut) award in the Kitschies! Congratulations also to the wonderful Will Staehle, whose cover art for The Age Atomic by Adam Christopher has been nominated for the Inky Tentacle.

Here’s what just a few people have had to say about Nexus:

“Ramez Naam’s debut novel Nexus is a superbly plotted high-tension technothriller about a War-on-Drugs-style crackdown on brain/computer interfaces … full of delicious, thoughtful moral ambiguity … excellent spycraft, kick-ass action scenes, and a chilling look at a future cold war over technology and ideology, making a hell of a read.”
– Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing

“It’s good. Scary good. Take a chance and stop reading now and have a great time reading a bleeding edge technical thriller that is full of surprises.”
– James Floyd Kelly, Wired.com’s GeekDad blog

“a fast, fun read which is both emotionally engaging and thought-provoking. You’ll be mulling over the implications of Nexus — the book and the drug — long after you put the book down.”
– Annalee Newitz, IO9.com

“Naam displays a Michael Crichton-like ability to explain cutting-edge research via the medium of an airport techno-thriller.”
– SFX Magazine

“the action scenes are crisp, the glimpses of future tech and culture are mesmerizing”
– Publishers Weekly

“Mr. Naam sees all the angles of future technology almost too imaginatively to keep up with … Nexus joins Paul McAuley’s Fairyland (1995) as a double-edged vision of the post-human.”
– Tom Shippey, Wall Street Journal

“This sophisticated page-turning techno-thriller is one of my favorite stories of all time … Naam is remarkable in his ability to address deep philosophical concepts while keeping the story line light, fast, and action-packed.”
– Stephen L. Macknik, Scientific American Illusion Chasers blog

“Naam, an expert in new technologies and author of More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement (2005), turns in a stellar performance with his debut sf novel … Naam has set himself a difficult challenge here: he’s telling a story in which much of the action and dialogue takes place inside the characters’ minds. But he succeeds admirably”.
– David Pitt, BookList

“a very readable book … deals with real world ramifications of next-generation technology in a believable, if somewhat scary, fashion. It’s accurate without being boring, and action-packed without being trite or vapid.”
– Matthew S. Dent, Interzone

The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuThe Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu, which has not only been receiving amazing reviews but also made it into the top ten of the Goodreads Choice Awards science fiction novels of 2013, has now been given an Alex (ALA) Award for adult books that appeal to teens! Want a reminder of why Tao is getting so much love?

Since the moment I finished Wesley Chu’s debut novel, The Lives of Tao, I called reading it ‘the most fun I’ve had this year.’
– Staffer’s Book Review

Note to James Patterson fans: this is how to write a sci-fi page turner.
– Sci-Fi Bulletin

A sci-fi thriller this may be, but it has a lot of emotional depth to it.
– Fantasy Faction

Wesley Chu’s debut novel The Lives of Tao is a fun book that will appeal directly to those who enjoy Charles Stross’s Laundry novels (2004-).
– Strange Horizons

The Lives of Tao is a fun book with a lot of energy and it really worked for me. Full of action, adventure, martial arts, gunplay, and large quantities of geeky goodness. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for something a lighter than the current swathe of serious sci-fi / fantasy.
– Fantasy Book Review

An exceptionally entertaining book, Chu’s writing is easy to consume and leaves you wanting more.  Definitely one to read, and an author to watch.
– British Fantasy Society

…makes this book what it is: one of the freshest, most fun debuts I’ve read in quite a while!
– My Bookish Ways

I think this is one of the best amalgamations of SF, Thriller, buddy-stories, comedy and other genre assortments, which was even more impressive because it’s a debut and is funny as hell. The story is a nice one with a bit of everything to satisfy most readers, beginning with characterization.
– Fantasy Book Critic

We need to be able to identify with what’s going on, and while sci-fi has historically given us a vehicle to discuss some very serious things by using the unreality as a smokescreen (female officers on the Enterprise and whatnot) to tell a really compelling and interesting story in science fiction, the window dressing of future worlds and alien species needs to still allow reasonable suspension of disbelief and Chu absolutely nails it.
– Speculative Post

“Vividly entertaining, this is a book that looks past the lively and thrilling glamour of life as an international spy and also merges several genres together into a cohesive whole to tell a story that rocks from start to finish.”
– The Founding Fields (Shadowhawk)

“The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu is a very interesting book, and right from the start you will find yourself drawn into the strong narrative and the interesting characters.”
– The Founding Fields (Bane of Kings)

You guys, this book was just AWESOME. I literally don’t have a single complaint about it. It was an action-packed, fun-filled joy ride and I can’t wait to see what’s next in store for Roen and Tao.
– Sarah Says Read

It’s easy to forget about all of that science fiction stuff when you are busy laughing at and cheering for Roen Tan. And that, more than anything else, makes The Lives of Tao one of the best debuts I’ve read this year.
– The 52 Review

Pantomime by Laura Lam

Pantomime-144dpiLastly, we wanted to mention one of our Strange Chemistry titles that has also been pulling in a lot of praise and awards nominations recently. Pantomimea YA fantasy novel by Laura Lam, has been shortlisted in the 2014 NE Teen Book Award, nominated for the 2014 ALA Popular Paperbacks List in the GLBTQ category and the 2014 Cybils Award, and has been announced in the final 2014 Rainbow List! Wow! So what makes Pantomime so special? Here is just a small selection of what people have been saying:

Pantomime by Laura Lam took me into a detailed and exotic world, peopled by characters that I’d love to be friends with . . . and some I’d never want to cross paths with.”
– Robin Hobb, author of the Farseer trilogy

“Ancient myths, vintage tech and living wonders abound in the riotous carnival of fancy which is Pantomime. Lam paints her world with greasepaint and stardust while exploring the notion of the circus ‘freak’ with subtle brilliance. A spectacular and brave debut!”
 Kim Lakin-Smith, author of Cyber Circus

“The atmosphere of R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is everything that I have been missing in other circus reads of late . . . It’s a brave book and one that deserves to be read by a wide audience.”
– Ellie @ Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

“These characters are brilliant . . . You can’t help but fall in love with each of them in turn . . .  A completely eye-opening, enthralling debut.”
– Joanne @ Once Upon a Bookcase

Pantomime is a dark, gritty world where all the fun of the fair can turn sinister at any time.”
– Hannah @ My Book Journey

“A fantastic read, a stunning debut and a jaw dropping secret! I cannot wait for book two.”
– Kirsty @ The Overflowing Library

“If there’s ever a book that you need to rush out and pre-order this is it . . . Pantomime is quite possibly one of the best fantasies of its type I have read this year.”
– Raimy @ Readaraptor

“Read Pantomime and know what good fantasy can be: intricate, heartbreaking and heartwarming. The best new book I’ve read this year.”
– Andrew Hook

Pantomime has all the magic and mystery of The Night Circus . . .”
– Maria M. Elmvang

“ I actually stayed up to the early hours of the morning because I just needed to know what was going to happen . . . Pantomime is a fascinating, exciting, thought provoking, colourful read.”
– Leanne @ District YA

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100th Book

100th Book Celebration: 100 Books for £100 for 100 Readers

Over the last four-and-a-bit years, we’ve published a range of SF/F/WTF? that we’re immensely proud of; from our very first titles, Moxyland by Lauren Beuekes and Slights by Kaaron Warren to today’s 100th title, Adam Christopher‘s Hang WireWe’ve had award-winners (Lauren’s Zoo City), great sellers (such as Ramez Naam‘s Nexus, amongst many more) and critically-acclaimed titles, such as Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter (also just nominated for the Philip K. Dick award!).

To celebrate this milestone, we’ve put together a range of special events. We’re giving away 10 copies of Hang Wire over on Goodreads, and for the past week have been running an exclusive competition with Tor.com to win a USB with ALL 100 books, as well as lots of other goodies popping up around the web.

Today – the US/ebook launch date of Hang Wire – we are launching a special Robot Trading Company promotion: 100 Books for £100. On a normal day, all 100 titles would sell for £545… a recession busting saving of £445! You can choose between a single 43Mb zipfile containing all 100 ebooks and a bundle version which will allow you to download all 100 titles individually.

This is available for the first 100 purchasers only, so be sure to take advantage of our temporary celebration madness!

RTC-Angry-Robot-100-for-100

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